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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 113-118

The prevalence of sharp injuries in the operative room among surgical residents and their behavior to them in the southern region of Saudi Arabia


Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Saad Mohammed Abdullah Alqahtani
Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ssj.ssj_1_19

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Background: Residents of surgical specialties have a high risk of sharp injuries. The reporting behaviors have a critical step in prophylaxis and early treatment. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of sharp injuries in the operative room among surgical residents and their behavior. Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted including 166 surgical specialty residents who involved in operating procedures from seven hospitals in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. A self-administrating questionnaire about sharp injuries, predisposing factors for sharp injuries, and practice of universal precautions during the surgical procedures was used for data collection. The study questionnaire was developed by the researchers after intensive literature review and another research tool from a previous similar study which was conducted in King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah city of Saudi Arabia. Results: About 64% of the residents have had at least one sharp injury in the last year. Most of these injuries (53.3%) occurred while suturing and 76.6% claimed the reason was due to fatigue. Most of the recent injuries (86%) were self-induced injuries caused with a solid needle (65.4%). The most common action post the injury was replacing the gloves and the needle (36.7%). Only 9% of them have reported all of their injuries to the concerned authorities, and 56% claimed the reason that they were not bothered. About 75.3% of them were aware of their local policies. Conclusion: Sharp injuries and needlestick are common among surgical residents, but they have weak reporting behavior. More educational training program about the sharp-related safety program may improve their attitude and behavior regarding sharp injuries.


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